Grace in Small Things No. 566

  1. The green is all over the place. Spring sprung a while ago, but after a Saskatchewan winter, it takes me some time to adjust.
  2. The high today is 28°C/82°F. I feel alive again.
  3. When the winter sadness lifts enough, I can feel my breath enter my lungs as though I have not breathed in months. Although, maybe I can feel my breath again today because my antihistamines are working again. Whatever the reason, I'll take it.
  4. I've been bingeing on 3rd Rock from the Sun. The Solomons are my temporary extra family.
  5. There is a hint of the possibility of rain in the clouds, and even the anticipation of rain is delicious.

Wage a battle against embitterment and take part in Grace in Small Things, a community for acknowledging and growing gratitude.

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Elan Morgan

Elan Morgan is a blogger, designer and consultant, and speaker who blogs and works from schmutzie.com, spreads gratitude through the graceinsmallthings.com social network, celebrates quality blogging with the canblogawards.com, and speaks all over. She has been seen in the Globe & Mail, Best Health and Woman's Day magazines, TEDxRegina, and on CBC News and Radio. She believes in and works to grow both personal and professional quality, genuine community, and meaningful content online.

Cat Naps In the Sun With Kisses

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Onion is living the life we all dream about, except for the part where he spends a lot of it sleeping on my kitchen floor. None of us probably want to do that.

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Elan Morgan

Elan Morgan is a blogger, designer and consultant, and speaker who blogs and works from schmutzie.com, spreads gratitude through the graceinsmallthings.com social network, celebrates quality blogging with the canblogawards.com, and speaks all over. She has been seen in the Globe & Mail, Best Health and Woman's Day magazines, TEDxRegina, and on CBC News and Radio. She believes in and works to grow both personal and professional quality, genuine community, and meaningful content online.

10 Things I Liked Enough to Show You: 16–22 May 2015

Fik-Shun's dance moves at World of Dance Las Vegas 2014 continue to surprise me right to the end of this video. His creativity and humour are immense:


Rebecca Onion's "Against Generations" at Aeon:

…in real life, I find generational arguments infuriating. Overly schematised and ridiculously reductive, generation theory is a simplistic way of thinking about the relationship between individuals, society, and history. It encourages us to focus on vague ‘generational personalities’, rather than looking at the confusing diversity of social life.

Slap a man with an eel. You know it's the right thing to do.


John Brownlee's "Errol Morris: How Typography Shapes Our Perception Of Truth" at Fast Company:

In 2013, acclaimed filmmaker and author Errol Morris ran a bold experiment. With the collusion of the New York Times, he asked 45,000 readers to take an online test. The test allegedly measured whether or not readers were optimists or pessimists. But in reality, Morris was trying to find out if the typeface a statement was written in had any impact on a reader's willingness to agree with that statement. Simply put, are some typefaces more believable than others?

It's been a week of Jane's Addiction's Ritual De Lo Habitual over here. How weird is it that this album is going to 25 years old in August?


Mallory Ortberg's "Sad Queer Classics, Fixed" at The Toast:

“What a nice room this is,” David said.
“Thanks,” Giovanni said. “It’s mine.”
Neither of them were publicly executed.
– Giovanni’s Room, James Baldwin

Daysha Edewi and Candace Lowry's "What Nude Fashion Looks Like On Black Women" at BuzzFeed:

We brought in four black women to try on nude-colored items of clothing and makeup. This is what happened…

Michaeleen Doucleff's "Scientists Crack A 50-Year-Old Mystery About The Measles Vaccine" at NPR:

Children who get the measles vaccine are probably more likely to get better health care in general — maybe more antibiotics and other vaccines. And it's true, health care in the U.S. has improved since the 1960s.
But Mina and his colleagues have found there's more going on than that simple answer.


Rob Wile's "Members of a Canadian indigenous tribe turned down $267,000 per person to allow a pipeline to be built through their land" at Fusion:

The band wasn’t interested.
“This is not a money issue: this is environmental and cultural,” the band said in a statement. Representatives of the band voted unanimously against the offer.